Colin or Colene

Through the window by which I sit at my desk upstairs, I can see the top of a tower.  It sticks out like a sore thumb on a fingerless hand, which has been severed from its once-accompanying arm, and placed in some kind of embalming tank surrounded by desperate neon letters saying, “PLEASE LOOK AT…

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Books That Changed Me: The Great Gatsby

My relationship with F. Scott Fitzgerald’s masterpiece, The Great Gatsby, has perhaps been as tumultuous as the novel’s reception itself.  It was poorly received upon its first publication in 1925, moving only 20,000 copies, and being met with relative apathy from the reading American public. Not until 1942, after Fitzgerald’s death, did the novel push…

Race, its Uses and Misuses

By David E.J.A. Bennett  The term ‘race’ is a somewhat broad and ambiguous term, and, as such, its use and meaning are changeable depending on the context in which they are used, and the intention of the user. The Oxford Dictionary of English defines race as “each of the major divisions of humankind, having distinct…

My Quest for the Trojan Horse (in Books)

By David E.J.A. Bennett  It all began one summer – I don’t know what year… probably 2008. My fascination with literature had not yet reached its terminal state, at which it currently and continuously resides. Something drew to me to a story which I and most people are familiar with: The story of the Trojan…

George Orwell Loved and Hated the Poor

By David E.J.A.Bennett  Arthur Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell, is considered perhaps the greatest socialist writer of the twentieth-century. His masterpiece, Nineteen Eighty-Four, depicts the struggles of the working classes under the brutal rule of a totalitarian government. His depictions of ‘Big Brother’ – who is always watching – has become synonymous with…

The Strange Case of Agatha Christie’s Disappearance

Hercule Poirot (not pronounced ‘poy-rott’) is perhaps the best-known tv detective of all time, with his little moustache and funny little French (Belgian) accent, he is truly a masterpiece of character writing, Mon’Ami. Or perhaps it is Miss Marple, the outwardly innocuous old lady, sitting in a chair at a luxury hotel, noticing every tiny…

Satire: Queen Elizabeth: “Philip just had to go!”

Saturday, 20 May, 2017 In a candid interview with respected broadsheet The Daily Star, Her Royal Highness Queen Elizabeth II spoke for the first time about her husband’s retirement from public service. “Philly is in good spirits” she said, “but we all knew the time was right.” Typically known for his sensitive diplomatic approach, the…